Posts

Showing posts with the label computers

Crytek's CryEngine Embraces Linux

Image
Linux gaming is starting to catch on and build up some momentum. Following in the footsteps of Valve’s Source engine, Epic’s Unreal Engine 4, and Unity 5, Crytek's CryEngine supports Linux. This also means that it will have support for SteamOS. This also means that it will be way easier for developers who are currently making games on these engines to add support for Linux. Even with this, developers will still have to go a little out of their way and do some work in order to add Linux support to their Steam games, so every game that comes out won't have it. So don't get your hopes up on that. But either way, there will be a lot of titles coming out in the future and the technology will become more widely adopted. It reduces the effort needed by a lot. This might not be huge news to all of the indie game players out there. Smaller companies might not want to invest the extra time into adding support for Linux, but for the huge, new AAA games the cost of porting them to Linu

Avago Acquiring Broadcom for $37 Billion

Image
According to Avango Technologies, they are ready to buy out Broadcom for a whopping $37 billion. That is a huge amount of money that you could probably buy anything you ever wanted with, and Bloomberg says it is the biggest tech deal to ever be made. Avango said that after the deal is done, the combined worth of the companies will be $77 billion. The new company is going to be called Broadcom LTd, and it will be headed by Hock Tan, the CEO of Avango. Right behind companies like Intel, Samsung, TSMC, Qualcomm, and Micron, Broadcom would be the 6th largest semiconductor company in the world. Many people don't really know about Avango, but they started out as a division of Hewlett-Packard before they split off into their own company years later. And everyone is pretty familiar with HP . Avango specializes in offering products for wireless communications, wired infrastructure, enterprise storage, and industrial applications. Broadcom is mainly known for their chips for communications d

Custom Lego Computer Brings Out the Kid in All of Us

Image
Image Courtesy of Total Geekdom Legos have been a staple of childhood for years. Unlike some toys that come and go with the times, Legos have always reigned supreme and shown incredible longevity. Legos are so popular and so iconic, in fact, that Mike Schropp over at Total Geekdom created an entire computer out of Legos.....an entire, real, working computer. Now this concept isn't new. Schropp made his first Lego computer back in 2011 but has since had tons of requests to reproduce the concept. People really took to the concept and inquired about getting one of their own and even asking Schropp about custom variations. However, the original concept wasn't one that was easily replicated. With all the interest in the computer, Schropp has been trying to figure out a way to make one that wasn't hard to reproduce and one that could be purchased by anyone looking for a new computer with a unique twist. The challenge was to make a Lego computer that was compatible with a wide arr

Computer and Network Security: Why It's Important

Image
Any business, whether long standing or just starting out, needs an adequate view and understanding of network security. Any kind of business or corporation keeps lists of vendors, customers and their accounts, budget access and spending, and more within their secured networks. This is all vital information that is, essentially, the lifeblood of any company. When you have assets at risk, such as developmental research, it's important to have a network security system in place that you're entire company knows how to work and is informed on. Security within a company goes way beyond the night watch guard in the parking lot. It also goes beyond one simple technology. It's a unique system that has to be appropriated piece by piece so that each branch of the company's security works in tandem with each other. Computer security, albeit just one aspect of security as a whole, is arguably the biggest portion of company security and integrity. Think about it. All of the informati

Magnetic Materials Could Make Computers 1,000 Times More Powerful

Image
If you have ever had to actually use your laptop on your lap, you know all too well that they can produce a ton of heat, especially when the processor is working hard. No matter how advanced computer technology gets, the amount of heat that a computer produces is something we can't seem to get away from. If you think about it, all of the extra heat given off is just wasted energy that could be used for something else. A team of engineers at UCLA have found a way to make integrated circuits more efficient using a class of magnetic materials that are called multiferroics. Basically, everything you use daily, like your computer, phone, TV, and many other things, relies on tons of transistors packed together making an integrated circuit. When chained together, transistors act as logic gates. The energy passing through these transistors results in large amounts of heat and loss of electrons. There really shouldn't be a way around it, but multiferroic materials have found a way to by

HP Launches New Compaq 8200 Elite All-In-One PC

Image
Just a few days after announcing that it was planning to shut down its PC business, HP has launched an all new all-in-one desktop aimed specifically at business customers. Branded the HP Compaq 8200 Elite, this computer comes with a 23-inch HD LED display as well as your choice of either Windows 7 Professional, Ultimate or Home Premium as your operating system. While all-in-one computers like this aren't really breaking stories, this one is a bit of a surprise given HP's previously reported stance on computers. HP announced last week that it would discontinue its TouchPad tablet and basically shutter its WebOS operation. In addition to that, HP also stated that it is looking to find a new direction for its PC business, the Personal Systems Group (PSG), as it refocuses the attention of its business around software solutions instead. According to a statement that was recently released by HP, "HP will consider a broad range of options that may include, among others, a full or

Cutting Costs Sees an Increase in Profits for Dell

Image
Good news recently came out of Dell as the computer company reported that its net income for the last quarter nearly tripled as Dell benefited from lower computer component costs and growth in certain areas of its more profitable product lines. Dell's shares rose 5% in extended trading, beating analysts' adjusted net income estimates but coming a bit short of revenue estimates. For Dell's first three months, which ended on April 29th, Dell earned $945 million, which equals about $0.49 per share, which was higher than the $341 million, $0.17 per share of last year. If you exclude one-time items, Dell earned $0.55 per share which easily beat the numbers expected by Wall Street. Analysts polled by FactSet estimated adjusted earnings of $0.43 per share. Revenue rose only 1% to $15.02 billion from $14.9 billion last year, which was short of the predicted $15.4 billion. Product revenue remained the same at $12.1 billion with services revenue rising 6% to $3.0 billion. Dell's

Scientists Try to Make a Schizophrenic Computer

Image
So, in my time as a blogger I have written about some pretty interesting things. I have also written about some pretty strange things and even some downright absurd things. However, this story may just be in a league of its own. A recent study by researchers at the University of Texas in Austin along with researchers from Yale University was set on creating the thinking of a schizophrenic mind on a computer. Yeah, that's right, they are trying to make a computer a schizophrenic by using a virtual network. Their research is based on something known as the hyperlearning theory of schizophrenia. This theory maintains that the disease schizophrenia stems from an inability to forget or ignore non-essential information. In their work, the research teams taught a series of stories to a computer model known to them as DISCERN. Using natural language processing, the computer is able to map out the different stories in a manner similar to the human brain. In the researchers' model, a sim

"Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing" Exhibit Opens at the Computer History Museum

Image
Whether it be art museums, history museums, museums that focus on a specific event in history or some other kind, people love going to museums. However, the majority of museums are generally more fun for the elderly, buffs of the certain genre or elementary school field trips. But there is one museum that caters to a different type of visitor, a more technological visitor, the Computer History Museum, and this week they have something new for all the tech junkies out there. This week the Computer History Museum opened a $19 million, 25,000-square-foot expansion with a new signature exhibition known as "Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing." This new exhibit, after being in development for over six years, represents the most comprehensive physical and online exploration of computing history in the world. It spans everything from the abacus and slide rules all the way to robots, Pong and the Internet. According to John Hollar, CEO of the museum located in Mountain View